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Is anybody here familiar with Trusted Computing?

Discussion in 'General Webmaster Helpdesk' started by Alexandru Ungur, Jan 18, 2005.

  1. Alexandru Ungur

    Alexandru Ungur New Member Webmaster

    Is anybody here familiar with what Trusted Computing is....?
    It's a matter of high interest to me, as the future of the whole IT world, as we know it today, depends on it.

    I'll quote some, for the neophites, from the TC FAQ,
    source: cl.cam.ac.uk/users/rja14/tcpa-faq.html

    --- random quotes ---
    1. What is TC - this `trusted computing' business?

    The Trusted Computing Group (TCG) is an alliance of Microsoft, Intel, IBM, HP and AMD which promotes a standard for a `more secure' PC. Their definition of `security' is controversial; machines built according to their specification will be more trustworthy from the point of view of software vendors and the content industry, but will be less trustworthy from the point of view of their owners. In effect, the TCG specification will transfer the ultimate control of your PC from you to whoever wrote the software it happens to be running. (Yes, even more so than at present.)

    2. What does TC do, in ordinary English?

    TC provides a computing platform on which you can't tamper with the application software, and where these applications can communicate securely with their authors and with each other. The original motivation was digital rights management (DRM): Disney will be able to sell you DVDs that will decrypt and run on a TC platform, but which you won't be able to copy. The music industry will be able to sell you music downloads that you won't be able to swap. They will be able to sell you CDs that you'll only be able to play three times, or only on your birthday. All sorts of new marketing possibilities will open up.

    There are some gotchas too. For example, TC can support remote censorship. In its simplest form, applications may be designed to delete pirated music under remote control. For example, if a protected song is extracted from a hacked TC platform and made available on the web as an MP3 file, then TC-compliant media player software may detect it using a watermark, report it, and be instructed remotely to delete it (as well as all other material that came through that platform). This business model, called traitor tracing, has been researched extensively by Microsoft (and others). In general, digital objects created using TC systems remain under the control of their creators, rather than under the control of the person who owns the machine on which they happen to be stored (as at present). So someone who writes a paper that a court decides is defamatory can be compelled to censor it - and the software company that wrote the word processor could be ordered to do the deletion if she refuses. Given such possibilities, we can expect TC to be used to suppress everything from pornography to writings that criticise political leaders.
    --- end of quotes ---

    What do you people think of all this... ?

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